The growing scale and complexity of today’s networks has outpaced network engineers’ ability to reason about their correct operation. As a consequence, misconfigurations that lead to downtime and security breaches have become all too common.

Network-wide specification languages help bridge the abstraction gap between the intended high-level policies of a network and its low-level configuration. A compiler automatically generates the corresponding low-level configurations. This approach is analogous to the trend in software engineering over the last several decades, which has led to ever-higher levels of abstraction and has been a huge boon for the software industry:  Imagine writing today's complex software in machine code!

In this post we will discuss the various attempts in industry and academia to define a higher level specification language for networks, while diving deeper in Propane; an intra- and inter-domain routing policy framework.

At Future:NET 2017, our CEO Ratul Mahajan gave the keynote presentation about how we can help network engineers and operators make their networks highly agile, reliable, and secure by adapting proven approaches employed by hardware and software engineers. In his keynote, Ratul introduced the concept of the new network engineering workflow inspired by capabilities used by hardware and software engineers.

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